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F.A.Q HEADING_TITLE

Q: How do I  get added to your waiting list for a Puppy?

Please email admin@bulldogsonstuff.com.au or via contact us, requesting an application form. This  form is only for us to find out two things.....

1. You really do want to go on the waiting list,

2. What your puppy requirements are, ie pet, bitch, show

Q: Why are English Bulldog Puppies so expensive and difficult to find?

A: English bulldogs are difficult to breed. An English bulldog will more often than not , need  to be artificially  inseminated and will most likely need to have a c-sections for delivery. The puppies are never left alone with the mum. Bulldogs are different to other breeds and need to be watched 24 / 7 and require human care and attention. We live, eat, sleep and breath puppies for the entire time they are with us, so please understand, we are not car dealers, their prices are not up for negotiation.

Q: Do you encourage others to become Breeder?

Yes, We encourage anyone who wants to become a breeder. We sell our pups on limited registration, so as to encourage you to come back to us when you are ready to start a breeding program. This enables us to provide guidance and assists when needed. Breeding is a lot of hard work but very rewarding.

Q: What happens when you buy a pup?

When you choose to purchase a puppy from us, we keep you updated every step of the way. Once your puppy has been secured (this is not a deposit) we stay in close contact with you so that you are able to see photos of how your puppy is growing and developing.

You are welcome to visit with your puppy as often as you like. When your puppy reaches 8-10 weeks of age and finally able to join your family, they will come to you with an extensive detailed information package covering all aspects of housing and caring for your new puppy. We are happy to support you 24 / 7, if you are worried or if you have any questions at all about your puppy. Remember we once had a puppy for the first time! Been there, Done That!

Q: Any Tips on Housebreaking?

As with any new Bulldog, housebreaking will require some work and effort on your part. Many new pet owners struggle with the process of housebreak, but with a little hard work, some diligent effort, and tips from experienced dog owners you can train your dog to enjoy outdoor duties.

Tip 1: Scheduled feeding time. Many owners feed on an irregular basis. Feed your new English Bulldog the same time to get them into routine.

Tip 2: Followed by the scheduled feeding, allow them 10-15 minutes for the food to settle and then take them outside.

Tip 3: Give them a guided tour. Your Bulldog will need your help to know where the appropriate spot to do the deed should take place.

Tip 4: Reward your Bulldog with praise and a treat for doing a good job. A little snack and some fantastic praise goes a long way in the process.

Tip 5: Schedule outdoor times every 90 minutes, if possible. Once they get into the habit of going outside on a regular basis and they will get comfortable knowing where to go to the toilet.

Tip 6: If they have an accident in the house, provide them with a firm NO if you catch them in the act. If you are not aggressive, do something that will startle them, and then take them directly outside.

Tip 7: Take them outside right away when you wake up; giving them the opportunity to go to the toilet outside rather than inside.

Tip 8: Take away liquids a couple hours before bed time, just like children if you allow them to drink massive amounts of liquids before bedtime, they will need to relieve themselves at some point during the evening

Tip 9: Do a nightly outside trip, this is good to do a couple hours before bedtime and 10 minutes before bedtime.

Tip 10: Be diligent, the number one issue with pet owners having housebreaking issues is the lack of consistency. Be firm, be regular, and setup a routine that works for both you and your Bulldog!

Q: Are Bulldog's okay in the Hot Weather and can you Exercise a Bulldog ?

If it is going to be a HOT day! The heat can cause some major problems for British Bulldogs that you should be aware of. Here are some tips and suggestions to help you get through the summer heat with your Bulldog.

Unlike many other breeds, British Bulldogs do not take well to extreme temperatures. The breed has some breathing issues and for this reasons extreme hot temperatures can cause serious injury and even death. During the summer heat, please pay special attention to leaving your canine outdoors or exposing them to these extreme conditions. Never leave your Bulldog in a vehicle during the summer as the temperatures inside the car will be enough to cause death and serious injury to your dog.

Guidance I have always gone by! If it is too hot for a Child then its too hot for your Bulldog.

Exercise is always important, but during these hot summer days, do not take long walks without plenty of stops, water, and a shady tree to relax. Here are some tips to keep your Bulldog safe during the summer heat.

  • Run your air conditioning when your not at home, often times if you are gone you may turn it off, but a cool temperature inside will provide your Bulldog a comfortable surrounding.
  • Provide a shaded area outside for your English Bulldog. If you do not have trees, purchase an umbrella or something that will provide a shady area. Don't leave them outside too long though as they will need the comfort of your air conditioned home to remain healthy.
  • Provide lot's of water, I would recommend three water dishes. One inside for day to day use, one outside that has a fresh supply of water, and one you can take with you in the car or during walks.
  • Finally don't force your Bulldog into exercise. Generally speaking you can tell when they are tired or unwilling, this is a good indication they may need to relax or the heat is getting to them. Heat stroke in Bulldogs during the summertime can be detected by heavy panting, lots of drooling, twitching muscles, vomiting, and a daxed look. To cool your English Bulldog down, give it a cold bath, allow plenty of fluids, and call your local vet!
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